Saving the world - one LED at a time


LED spotlight (3W, MR16)

I am all for saving the whales and hugging penguins, especially if it gives me an excuse to buy more LED stuff. This apartment is only a few months old but the construction company chose to put three MR16 halogen spotlights in the bathroom, that is 3 x 35W for a total of 105W to light up a tiny room. What where they thinking? Halogen spotlights are a bit '80ish anyway.

In other rooms I can just screw in a low power fluorescent lamp as a replacement for an incandescent light bulb and feel good about my self and my progressive approach to energy consumption. But with tiny MR16 spotlights, there are no fluorescent alternatives available that I know of. Google led me to led1.de that offered a few LED alternatives though and that is even better than fluorescent alternatives.

They had two "high power" alternatives when it came to MR16, high power in this case meaning 3W which is about as much as you can get out of a LED today. One alternative uses a Cree XR-E LED and the other a Seoul P4. I chose the P4 because it is brighter but unfortunately it also has a colder white (6500K) compared to the warmer white of the Cree (3200K).

Still no WiFi on the train


Still no WiFi on the train

The year is 2008. The high-speed Pendolino train in packed with commuters using laptops and all kinds of net capable gadgets - and there is no WiFi to connect to.

This is getting silly. Finland takes great pride in being a forerunner in all things wireless and still the national carrier Finnair and the national railway company VR show no sign of offering WiFi or internet in any form what so ever to their customers.

They could. Other airlines do and trains could use the @450 network like some trams in Helsinki do.

The surprisingly big home network


Gigabit switch

I have got 11 devices connected to my home network - so says the statistics page in my dsl modem.

I was browsing trough the settings pages in my dsl modem and came across the dhcp list and there where 11 devices listed. This means 11 devices have, during the last week, been connected to my home network and requested IP numbers for themselves. They have been connected either to my home Ethernet network or my home WiFi network.

Eleven. That's surprisingly many. Do we even own that many Ethernet/WiFi capable devices?